HIGH-CLASS
IN-EAR

DM7

BGVP

Rating

Price

8.8

270 €

Review published:

05/2019

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Driver

6

per Side

0

Dynamic

6

Balanced

Impedance

13.5 Ohm

PZ/ES/PL

0

Sound

8.5

Bass

9

Mids

8.5

Trebles

Sensitivity

115 dB

8.7

Handling

9

Haptic

B

Value

+

Daily Life

Frequency

10 - 40000 Hz

Intro

The BGVP DM7 is the direct successor to the DM6 and contains another BA driver in its case, which brings it to a total of 6. The DM7 no longer has the strong V-signature of the DM6, or DMG, but strengthens the midrange and sounds more linear and natural regardless of the frequency response.

Handling

ergonomic. It is noticeable that in the previous versions of the DM7 foam was used as a filter in one of the 4 sound tubes, but now also a metal filter, like in the other three tubes, has found its place, which looks even more valuable for my taste!

The scope of delivery is almost identical to the DM6. You get a pair of form tips, 2 sets of silicone tips (S, M, L) and a cleaning brush. The cable has been replaced and is much more elastic and elegant. However, you have to do without the L-plug, which can be an advantage, especially for the trouser pocket.

The isolation is better in comparison to the DM6, whereby less penetrates to the outside and inside. Thus the DM7 is above average.

Sound

The DM7 goes a different way than the DM6. It has a warmer and more homogeneous sound. Also the use of a super tweeter is noticeable in the resolution, although the DM6 has probably the larger extension.

The bass is very similar to that of the DM6. However, we get a softer, but clean and fast bass reproduction, which makes the DM7 sound more harmonic and balanced in the bass range and the overall signature. The bass doesn't have the punch of the DM6 in the midrange anymore, but it still looks more structured and uniform, even if it rarely drifts into the lower midrange like the DM6 does.
The DM7 is certainly not shy of bass, but nothing for bass enthusiasts who want to get more out of it. This is more in the direction of a CCA C16, which isn't a bass monster either, but the bass fits perfectly into the overall presentation and convinces with its modest, but high quality way.

The mids are objectively not so much taken back as with the DM6, even if the graph might lead to a different conclusion. This is probably due to the fact that the DM7 prefers the lower highs more than the DM6 and in interaction with the bass a warmer and more dynamic sound is suggested than with the colder DM6. Nevertheless, it can be attached to the male voices, which come forward better and have more body. The reproduction of instruments in resolution and naturalness is also a small step forwards. The big advantage of the DM7 is that it gets by almost completely without annoying peaks and sibilants, but still looks wider and brighter in the middle than the DM6. This is a clear improvement, but similar to the comparison of the Oriveti OH300 to the OH500, it needs some getting used to.

Compared to the DM6, the DM7 doesn't sound quite as open in the highs, but a bit more depressed at first in the direct A/B listening impression. But the feeling fades away in a few minutes.
Then one notices that the level of detail of the DM6 is still there, but without the annoying peaks. It doesn't jump directly into your face anymore, but seems more subtle, but nevertheless perceptible. This makes listening even more exciting, as not everything is presented to you in exaggerated proportions on a silver platter, but is still fully present. Especially the preference of the lower highs make them appear fuller and more textured. There are no signs of fatigue even after a long time. In summary, the highs are relaxed, high-resolution, rich in detail and precise, also in terms of three-dimensionality.

With separation and stage the DM6 and DM7 do not take much. Meaning the DM7 impresses with a good depth and width, but like the DM6 it rarely goes beyond the head. However, I assume that the DM7 has a better stereo image and a more homogeneous overall picture. The DM7's crossover, which ensures a smooth transition and produces a more dynamic sound than the DM6, also deserves praise.

Outro

BGVP manages with the DM7 to eliminate the small errors of the DM6 for my taste. Nevertheless, I think there's a lot more to be done with the DM-Series. I would like the DM7 to have the airiness and depth and punch of the DM6, while retaining its soft, textured, higher quality bass reproduction and balanced, transparent and detailed midrange and treble. It's always arguable about the bass, as I appreciate the use of a dynamic driver, but as with the CCA C16, I'm also very fond of the restrained bass when it fits into the overall sound. However, there are also budget representatives like the BA bass of the KZ AS10 which is much more potent, but still combines all the positive features of a BA driver. I think you can get a bit more out of the Knowles 22955 than that. All in all, the DM7 is a premium product and an improvement in all aspects of the DM6. However, to be fair, you have to say that the DM6 has the bigger fun factor due to the V-signature.

Legend

Haptic:

Here the processing plays a role and the usability of the scope of supply. Additionally the appearance, wearing comfort and robustness.


Value:
Here I evaluate for me subjectively the price/performance ratio - does not flow into the evaluation!

Z: No Brainer

A: money well spent

B: all right, you can do

C: gives better for less money

D: overpriced

E: collector's price

Daily life:
Here, I focus on the long-term audibility and whether I can hear it well out of the box. This is of course very subjective and therefore only a minimal deduction or bonus. 

(-0.1, 0, +0.1)

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1/3

SGZ-DN1

ZERO

DH3

DMS

DM6

VG4

DM7

DMG

EST12

EST12

Second Opinion:

Contact:

chi-fier@gmx.de

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CHI-FIEAR © 2020 by David Hahn